If you do not find the answer to your question here, please contact us at: keyboardsupport@cherryamericas.com or call us at (800) 510 1689.

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Barcode Scanners

Description:
What bar codes can be read when I attach an undecoded bar code scanner to the CHERRY 7000, 8000, 8113, & 8200 keyboards?

Answer:Most bar codes can be decoded. The keyboard automatically detects the specific bar code symbology. A list of all bar codes that can be decoded can be found in the User Manual.

Supported bar code symbologies:
Code 39
Code 128
Codabar
Interleaved 2/5
Industrial 2/5
MSI
Plessey
Matrix 2/5
Code 93
Code 11
Code 16K
EAN/JAN
UPC

Magnetic Stripe Readers

  1. History of the Plastic CardIn 1950, the Diners Club issued the first all plastic card for payment. The use of plastic cards for payment quickly spread due to the low price of PVC as well as the entry of Visa and MasterCard into the plastic money arena.Early plastic cards were embossed with general data such as the card number and the cardholder’s name. Signature fields and security printing were a feature of these cards created to provide protection against tampering and forgery. These security features quickly proved faulty as they relied solely on the retail staff for visual verification. Fraud and transaction costs increased yearly. The need for security and cost improvements was deemed essential.To reduce transaction costs, the magnetic card of today was created. A magnetic stripe added to the back of these plastic cards enabled data to be stored in a machine readable form.
  2. Magnetic Stripe Card Dimensions
    magnetic-stripe-card-dimensions
  3. There are two different types of magnetic stripe tape, high energy and low energy. High energy is a type of magnetic stripe tape made up of tiny particles that aren’t easily altered when in contact with a magnetic field. It makes the magnetic card less likely to be accidentally erased. On the other hand, low energy magnetic tapes can be easily erased because it uses different particles.
  4. Magnetic Card Data FormatA track is the encoded information on the magnetic stripe of a plastic card. CHERRY keyboards with an integrated magnetic card reader have the capability of reading up to 3 tracks in various combinations.Diagram of 3 Tracks on a Magnetic Stripe Cardmagnetic-card-data-formatTrack 1Per ISO 7813 for financial cards: Track 1 can contain up to 76 alphanumeric data characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 210 BPI (bits per inch) and a character configuration of 7 bits per character.Per AAMVA standards: Track 1 can contain up to 82 alphanumeric data characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 210 BPI and a character configuration of 7 bits per character.Track 2Per ISO 7813 for financial cards: Track 2 can contain up to 40 numeric data characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 75 BPI and a character configuration of 5 bits per character.Per AAMVA standards: Track 2 can contain up to 40 numeric data characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 75 BPI and a character configuration of 5 bits per character.Track 3Per ISO 7813 for financial cards: Track 3 can contain up to 107 numeric characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 210 BPI and a character configuration of 5 bits per character.Per AAMVA standards: Track 3 can contain up to 82 alphanumeric characters (including control characters) with a recording density of 210 BPI and a character configuration of 5 bits per character.AAMVA – American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators; a standard for reading and encoding driver’s license data on magnetic stripe cards.
      1. What Kind of Data is on a Credit Card?Abbreviations:
        FC – Format Code, a control character
        FS – Field Separator, a control character
        SS – Start Sentinel, also known as a header
        ES – End Sentinel, also known as a terminator
        LRC – Longitudinal Redundancy Check characterTrack 1 of a Credit Card*SS (Header) – optional
        *FC (Format code)
        *Credit Card Number (maximum of 19 digits)
        *FS (field separator) – usually ^
        *Cardholder’s Name
        *FS (field separator) – usually ^
        *Expiration Date (YYMM)
        *Service Code (maximum of 3 digits)
        * Discretionary Data – may include some or all of the following:
        *PVKI – PIN Verification Key Indicator
        *PVV – PIN Verification Value
        *CVV – Card Verification Value
        *CVC – Card Verification Code
        *ES (terminator) – optional
        *LRC (Longitudinal Redundancy Check Character)Sample of Track 1 Credit Card Data – without header or terminatorB4826762900098714^DOE/JANE S^0009836000000000760000008970000Track 2 of a Credit Card*SS (header) – optional
        *Credit Card Number
        *FS (field separator) – usually =
        *Expiration Date (YYMM)
        *Discretionary Data
        *ES (terminator) – optional
        *LRC (Longitudinal Redundancy Check)Sample of Track 2 Credit Card Data – without header or terminator4826762900098714=09836000076000897000
  5. Magnetic Card Readers – CHERRY Specific InformationCHERRY uses Mag-Tek brand magnetic card readers in our keyboards. Information on Mag-Tek can be found on their website www.magtek.com.
    The magnetic card reader is invisible to the keyboard and the PC until a card is swiped (read). When a card is read, the magnetic card reader takes over the keyboard interface to the PC and sends card data using the same scan codes used by the keyboard. The PC cannot distinguish between data from the keyboard and data from the magnetic card reader.The magnetic card reader is being supplied with power by the PC.CHERRY keyboards can read both high energy and low energy cards (coercivity).CHERRY keyboards can read any credit card that is compliant with the following ISO standards:ISO 7810 – Physical Characteristics of Credit Card Size Document
    ISO 7811-2 – Magnetic Stripe
    ISO 7811-4 – Location of Tracks 1 & 2
    ISO 7811-5 – Location of Track 3
    ISO 7813 – Financial Transaction Card DataAll CHERRY 3 track keyboards are able to read AAMVA cards.
  6. 6. What is AAMVA and What Kind of Data is on an AAMVA Card?AAMVA – American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators; a standard for reading and encoding driver’s license data on magnetic stripe cards.Track 1 dataThe following data is on track 1 AAMVA cards in order as follows:
    *State or Province
    *City
    *Name
    *AddressTrack 2 dataThe following data is on track 2 AAMVA cards in order as follows:
    *ISO Issuer Identifier Number (IIN)
    *Drivers License / Identification Number
    *= (field separator)
    *Expiration Date
    *Birth data
    *DL/ID# overflowTrack 3 dataThe following data is on track 3 AAMVA cards in order as follows:
    *Template V#
    *Security V#
    *Postal Code
    *Class
    *Restrictions
    *Endorsements
    *Sex
    *Height
    *Weight
    *Hair Color
    *Eye Color
    *ID#
    *Reserved Space
    *Error Correction
    *Security
Description:

The ISO-compliant coding of magnetic cards is as follows:

Track 1: 79 characters (incl. start, stop, LRC), each with 7 bits per character (6 Bit + Parity bit) at 210 bits per inch.

Track 2: 40 characters (incl. start, stop, LRC), each with 5 bits per character (4 Bit + Parity bit) at 75 bits per inch.

Track 3: 137 characters (incl. start, stop, LRC), each with 5 bits per character (4 Bit + Parity bit) at 210 bits per inch.

Description:

The CHERRY magnetic card reader keyboards can only read magnetic cards. How and where the data are written to the magnetic card depends only on the recording device and the application of the magnetic card.

CHERRY is therefore unable to supply information about where, for example, the customer number can be found / deciphered on a card with magnetic strips. This type of information can be obtained from the place where your magnetic cards are written or from your application software supplier.

CHERRY magnetic cards read the card contents one by one via the keyboard interface, i.e. the card data are sent to the PC system track by track, character by character, as though the card data had just been entered manually.

Processing of the data in your application codes is therefore driver-independent. The data can be processed by the application program as pure keyboard entry strings.

However, to distinguish between card data and genuine keyboard entries, the CHERRY magnetic card keyboards provide “headers” and “terminators” (see Knowledge Base for Headers and Terminators).

Description:

Solution:
It is recommended that you use a card cleaning kit designed to clean magnetic card readers. This will insure that no damage is done to the heads. CHERRY does not sell card cleaning kits. In the US, we recommend the following companies:

Clean Team
phone: (800) 888 8830
url: http://www.cleanteam.com

KIC Products
phone: (800) 818 1932
url: http://www.kicproducts.com

Miscellaneous

***CHERRY has manufactured keyboards in a variety of different languages. Listed below are languages that we have done in the past over our entire keyboard product line. Please note that not all languages are available for all keyboard models. Please contact CHERRY Sales for specific information.

AE = UK/ARABIC
AR = US/ARABIC
BB = BULGARIAN/US/CYRILLIC (“L” SHAPED ENTER KEY)
BE = BELGIUM
BG = BULGARIAN (US/CYRILLIC)
CD = CANADA
CH = SWITZERLAND
DE = GERMAN
DK = DENMARK
EE = ESTONIA
ES = SPAINIS
FA = FRENCH/ARABIC
FR = FRENCH
GB = UK/ENGLISH
GR = GREECE
HU = HUNGARY
IL = US/HEBREW
IS = ICELAND
IT = ITALY
JA = JAPAN (HIRAGANA)
JK = JAPAN (KATAKANA)
KO = US/KOREAN
KR = UK/KOREAN
LA = LATIN AMERICAN
LT = US/LITHUANIAN
NL = NETHERLANDS
NO = NORWAY
PL = POLAND
PO = PORTUGAL
RA = UK/CYRILLIC
RB = US/CYRILLIC
RC = US/CHINESE
RD = GERMAN/CYRILLIC
RE = US/PERSIAN
RF = GERMAN/PERSIAN
RG = US/CYRILLIC (“L” SHAPED ENTER KEY)
RL = US/CYRILLIC/LITHUANIAN
RO = ROMANIA
SF = SWEDEN/FINLAND
SK = SLOVAKIA
SL = SLOVENIA/CROATIA (LATIN I)
TF = TURKEY (LAYOUT F)
TH = US/THAILAND
TQ = TURKEY (LAYOUT Q)
TS = CZECH REPUBLIC
US = US/ENGLISH
YU = YUGOSLAVIA

CHERRY offers 3 styles of numeric keypads:
G80-3700LQAXX0
G84-4700PPBXX
G84-4700PRBXX

**The “XX” varies depending on the language of the keyboard.

The keypads will operate with a notebook computer without affecting the Num Lock on the Notebook in mode 2. You can put the keypad in mode 2 by:

Using the keypad:
Hold down the “NumLock” and “2” keys and press “Enter”.

Description:

What’s the difference in Mini-DIN (PS/2) and 5-pole DIN (AT) connectors? Does CHERRY supply an adapter cable to change my Mini-DIN / DIN cable to DIN / Mini-DIN?

Answer:

AT uses a large round 5 pin ‘DIN’ plug. PS/2 uses a small round 6 pin ‘DIN’ plug. Both have the same electrical signals connected. Although you cannot directly plug into the other for obvious reason, using a small adapter can change one plug into the other.

You can get the adapters from CHERRY using the following part number:

PS/2 -> AT: 617-0848
AT -> PS/2: 617-0580

Pin layout

Mini DIN Color DIN Plug
DATA 1 White 2
FREE 2 3
GRND 3 Black 4
+5V 4 Green 5
CLOCK 5 Yellow 1
FREE 6

 

 

DIN
din
Mini DIN
mini-din

 

This article refers to:

– CHERRY POS keyboards with barcode and/or magnetic card reader
– CHERRY Tools Software for POS keyboards

Description:
Programming the keyboard using the CHERRY Tools Software: If you deactivate the option ‘Stop Character Check Enabled’ you will apparently receive a random start character for different magnetic cards or barcodes.

With the first card (or bar code) you receive a dash (-), with the second one a slash (/), third an exclamation mark (!), fourth a character P, etc…

This ‘random characters’ problem can be fixed by activating the option ‘Stop Character Check Enabled’ again.
What causes this behavior?
Solution:
The Start Character is always the ´%´ character. It is not programmable and it will not be included in the output data of your CHERRY keyboard since it does not belong to the ‘real’ data of the track.

Disabling the ‘Stop Character Check’ the LRC character (the ´check-sum´) could be interpreted as a start character.

The LRC character will always be different depending on the preceding characters.

This article refers to:

all keyboards with PS/2 connector
at use on PCs with MSI Motherboard

On my PC with a MSI Motherboard the Keyboard does not work on the PS/2 port. Why? Affected Motherboards are:
– MSI KT266 PRO2
– MSI 845 Ultra ARU

Answer:
According to MSI you have to update the latest Bios version. You can find more information at http://www.msi.com.tw (direct link to the Bios-page: http://www.msi.com.tw/support/bios/note.htm!)
If there’s no bug fix available please try following workaround: In “Advanced Bios Feature Setup” you have to set the option “Num Lock” to “OFF”. Then the keyboard should be recognized.

This article refers to:

All keyboards

Symptom:
When I press several keys the PC begins to “beep”. This especially appears while playing games.

Reason:
This symptom is called “Ghost Key”. Ghost Keys can appear when more than two keys are pressed simultaneously. There are some specified key-combinations that have to be detected by the keyboard electronic (e.g. Ctrl+Alt+Del). Not specified combinations can be recognized but it’s not a must. This just depends on the layout of a keyboard.

You can find an overview about the Microsoft specified key combination under:
http://www.microsoft.com/HWDEV/TECH/input/Scancode.asp#New

This article refers to:

MS-DOS
Microsoft Windows 95
Microsoft Windows 98

Description:

If the computer is started in protected mode (e.g. by keeping the [Ctrl] key pressed or using system configuration tools), it may be that the CHERRY USB keyboard does not respond to any entry. In addition to that you might receive following (or similar) message:

“Windows mouse support: Windows could not find a mouse on your computer. You can now connect a serial mouse. When connecting a PS/2 mouse to the computer you must first switch the computer off.”

Solution:

Win95 and Win98 does not load USB drivers in protected mode. Also MS-DOS does not load a special USB driver.

This is the intention – protected mode is there precisely to prevent any drivers being loaded.

In order for you to use your CHERRY USB keyboard, you should activate the USB support via the BIOS of your PC (also called ‘legacy mode’). This should be a setting option of the BIOS.

This article refers to:
Microsoft Windows 98
Various BIOS versions
Usually USB technology

Description:
After my computer has powered up, Caps Lock mode is switched on automatically (including Num Lock and Scroll Lock)

Solution: Please be informed about following FAQ Q247853 – CAPS LOCK Key Is on at Startup With Universal Serial Bus Keyboard Installed at Microsoft!

Additional information:
A keyboard is not responsible for “Caps, Num and Scroll Lock”.
IBM-compatible keyboards only send the “key position code” to the PC, together with information on whether the key was pressed or released.

The keyboard driver of the operating system or the BIOS makes “legible” characters from these key position codes (providing no operating system has been loaded).

In the case of the “Caps Lock” key, for example, this means that, in simple terms, keyboards only send the “number” of the “Caps Lock” key to the system if the key has been activated.
The system then establishes that this key was the “Caps Lock” key, and switches the “Caps Lock” mode in the system.

As you did not constantly press the “Caps Lock” key immediately after the computer was powered up, the system itself must switch on “Caps Lock” mode.

You should therefore test the following in order to narrow down the nature of the problem:

  1. If this behavior occurs before the operating system has loaded, you should consult the BIOS manufacturer (a new update may be required). It may be, however, that the option “Activate Num, Shift or Scroll Lock automatically after booting” is set in your BIOS. Switch this option off as necessary.
  2. If this behavior does not occur until after the operating system has loaded, you should consult your operating system manufacturer (if necessary, request the fault clearing program ‘bug fix’ via the Internet).

It is our understanding that Case 2 occurs more frequently (particularly under WIN 98 / USB systems).

A keyboard error can almost certainly be ruled out in this case.

This article refers to:

All operating systems

Description:
The Euro symbol has not yet been printed on older keyboards. How can I use the keyboard to produce the Euro symbol?

Solution:
Creating and printing of the Euro symbol is done by your operating system. It is responsible for creating the Euro symbol. The keyboard electronics has not changed since the Euro symbol was introduced. The Euro symbol has only been printed on the new keyboards, but you can still use the keyboard to produce this character.

With or without the printed inscription: you only need to know how your operating system generates the Euro symbol.

For European keyboards and Microsoft operating systems, the Euro symbol can be created by using the key combination “Ctrl” + “e” or “Ctrl” + “Alt” + “e”. For UK Layout keyboards, use ‘ALT GR’ and the number ‘4’ key.

The only precondition is an operating system upgrade for printing the Euro symbol (adds the Euro symbol to your font types, for example).

This program upgrade is already included in Microsoft WIN 98.
For WIN 95 users, Microsoft provides the corresponding upgrade under http://www.microsoft.com.
Here you will also find information on Euro upgrades to other Windows versions.

Users of other operating systems should contact the relevant manufacturer!

CHERRY does not supply Euro upgrades of the OS.

For more information (for Windows operating systems) also go to http://www.microsoft.com/typography/faq/faq12.htm

This article refers to:

All operating systems

Description:
Although I have already installed my operating system manufacturer’s Euro symbol upgrade, the character does not appear in some of my fonts.

Solution:
Creating and printing of the Euro symbol is done by your operating system. The electronics of the keyboard has not changed since the Euro symbol was introduced. The Euro symbol has only been printed on the new keyboards.

Even if you have installed your operating system manufacturer’s Euro symbol upgrade, the Euro symbol can only be added to the fonts of that particular manufacturer.

So, for example, if you have received other fonts by freeware or via other application programs, you must also contact the manufacturers of those fonts to add the Euro symbol.

If this is not possible, then the only remaining option is to look for an alternative character set with the Euro symbol (e.g. via the Internet or a specialist dealer).

For more information (for Windows operating systems) also go to http://www.microsoft.com/typography/faq/faq12.htm

Serial Converters For the G84-4400 Trackball Unit

Keyboard- Converter P/N

G84-4400PPBXX0007-2101
G84-4400PRBXX0007-2101
G84-4400PPAXX0007-1813
G84-4400PRAXX0007-1813

**The “XX” varies depending on language of keyboard

Please call the keyboard hotline for further details

Europe: (49) 9643 18 206
United States: (800) 510 1689

This article refers to:

CHERRY Tools version 4.0 and higher

Description:

KeyMan error: “No CHERRY Supported Devices found” occurs every time the computer is booted.

Solution:

This error message appears if you install a newer version of CHERRY Tools without rebooting the computer after uninstalling the older version.

  1. Do a complete uninstall of the CHERRY Tools software by going to Start->Programs->CHERRY Tools->Setup. Choose to remove the installation and then choose to remove the complete package.
  2. Reboot the computer.
  3. Install the new version of CHERRY Tools

This article refers to:

All CHERRY PS/2 keyboards

Description:

Using a PS/2 to USB adapter to convert a CHERRY PS/2 keyboard to a USB interface

Solution:

Not all adapters work properly. Some adapters may work with some keyboard models but not others. Some adapters may work with come computer models and not others.

CHERRY has found during testing that “cable” type adapters have a better chance of working than the “stub” type adapter.

Because of these inconsistencies, CHERRY does not recommend nor support the use of PS/2 to USB adapters. We strongly recommend that you purchase a USB keyboard.

This article refers to:

All CHERRY keyboards

Description:

All lights are continuously flashing on the keyboard

Solution:

An internal electronic error will cause all lights on the keyboard to continuously blink. This error could be caused by spilling liquids into the keyboard or by a fault in the keyboards logic board.

Please contact CHERRY Keyboard Technical support to check on warranty status and for the nearest authorized repair center.

1 (800) 510 1689 or keyboardsupport@zf.com

Pointing Devices

This article refers to:

Microsoft Windows NT 4.0

Description:
A serial mouse was connected to my Windows NT 4.0 computer. I have changed it for a PS/2 mouse. The PS/2 mouse is duly recognized by the operating system.
When the machine is restarted, however, the error message “A Service Could Not Be Started ….see Event Protocol” is displayed. How can I get around this message?

Solution:
This message is generated by the driver of the serial mouse. To switch this driver off, select the icon “Devices” under START – SETTINGS – SYSTEM CONTROL. Then search for the entry “Sermouse” and click on the button “Start Type”. Now select “deactivated” from the list which appears, and click on “OK”. Then “Close” and restart the system. The error message should not appear again.

This article refers to:

MS Windows operating systems

Description:
I want to connect my PS/2 mouse to my PC’s COM port. I have bought an adapter cable for this purpose and connected the mouse, but the mouse wasn’t recognized – not even after various BIOS adjustments!

Solution:
Not every PS/2 mouse works with a COM port adapter. Use a “COMBO” mouse. It supports both protocols.

Smart Card Readers

  1. History of the Plastic Card In 1950, the Diners Club issued the first all plastic card for payment. The use of plastic cards for payment quickly spread due to the low price of PVC as well as the entry of Visa and MasterCard into the plastic money arena.Early plastic cards were embossed with general data such as the card number and the cardholder’s name. Signature fields and security printing were a feature of these cards created to provide protection against tampering and forgery. These security features quickly proved faulty as they relied solely on the retail staff for visual verification. Fraud and transaction costs increased yearly. The need for security and cost improvements was deemed essential.To reduce transaction costs, the magnetic card of today was created. A magnetic stripe added to the back of these plastic cards enabled data to be stored in a machine readable form. However, it was quickly learned that this data was still vulnerable. It can be read, deleted, and re-written by anyone with the right device. In order for the retailers to protect themselves against fraud, they had to go on-line with the card issuer for approval at the time of sale. This brought transaction costs back up, and still didn’t eliminate the need for the retail staff to visually verify signatures. Security is still a major issue. With the increase in technology, off-line transactions are necessary. The need for the Smart Card was eminent.
  2. Introduction of the Smart Card 1968 Jürgen Dethloff and Helmut Grötrupp, two German inventors, applied for a patent on their idea of incorporating an integrated circuit with a plastic card.1970 Kunitaka Arimura, a Japanese inventor, filed the first patent for the Smart Card of today.1974 Roland Moréno of France began obtaining patents on several functional aspects of the Smart Card and began selling licenses to manufactures.1984 The French Postal and Telecommunications services successfully carried out a field trial with telephone cards.1984/85 Germany implemented a pilot project for telephone cards using magnetic stripe, holographic, and smart cards. Smart Cards were proved to have the best security, flexibility, and reliability of the three technologies.1990 Over 60 million French telephone Smart Cards were in circulation.1993 The German Social Security Authority and the Sickness Fund Doctors Association began issuing a Health Card to every German citizen (approx. 79 million).
  1. What is a Smart Card? A Smart Card is a plastic card with an electronic microchip embedded in it. It is the size of a conventional credit card.Physical Properties physical-propertiesISO 7810 (ID-1 Card Standard)
    Dimensions – 85.6 mm x 54 mm
    Corner radius – 3.18 mm
    Card thickness – .76 mmISO 7816-2 (Contact Placement Standard)
    Dimensions noted in diagram

    Electrical Properties

    electrical-contacts

    eight-fieldsMost Smart Cards have eight contact fields. These form the electrical interface between the reader and the card’s microprocessor. Because contacts C4 and C8 are reserved for future use, some manufacturers have issued a 6 contact Smart Card for cost savings. Currently, these are functionally the same.

    A Smart Card requires a supply voltage of 5volts +/- 10%. There currently is a push for Smart Card standards to support 3volt technology because of the increase of Smart Card applications in telecommunications such as mobile phones. A wider voltage range handling 3-5 Volts will more than likely become mandatory in the future.

    1. Types of Cards – Contact & Contactless

contact-smart-card

Contact Cards

A contact Smart Card consists of the plastic card body, electrical terminal (the gold plated contacts), and a chip. In order to transfer data to and from the contact Smart Card, it must be inserted into a Smart Card reader.

contactless-smart-card

Contactless Cards

A contactless Smart Card consists of two plastic card bodies, a chip, and an antenna. Data can be transferred to and from the contactless card with the antenna and a coupler unit; without any physical contact.

There are two types of contact cards. Memory Cards and Microprocessor Cards. Memory cards are sometimes referred to as Smart Cards, but a Microprocessor Card is a true Smart Card.

  1. Microprocessor Cards (Smart Cards) A Smart Card contains a CPU, RAM, EEPROM, and ROM (its own operating system). A Smart Card is a “computer on a chip”. This “computer on a chip” allows for transmission, storage and processing of data with high security. The Smart Card’s operating and security logic systems supervise data transmission over the serial interface. These memory functions of writing, erasing, and reading are controlled.ROM – Read Only Memory; this type of memory can only be written to once during production. A Smart Card’s ROM contains most of the operating system, as well as diagnostic and testing functions. The ROM creates the “secure operating system” for Smart Cards. It eliminates back doors and other system tampering by programmers.EEPROM – Electrical Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory; this type of memory is used in Smart Cards for all data and programs that need to be modified or erased. EEPROM functions like a hard disk in a PC. The data will remain in memory even when there is no power.RAM – Random Access Memory; this is the Smart Card’s memory during one session. As soon as power is lost, the RAM will be cleared of all data.CPU – Central Processing Unit; this is the device in the Smart Card that interprets and executes instructions. It is the “brain”.Smart Card Operating SystemA Smart Card’s operating system usually contains between 3 and 24 Kbytes of code depending on the application(s) the card is used with. Unlike the operating systems you are used to such as Windows, the Smart Card OS doesn’t contain a user interface. There is no access to external peripheral or storage media. The OS is responsible for:*File management
    *Memory management
    *Instruction programming and execution control
    *Protected access to data
    *Loading, operating, and management of applications
    *Data transmission
    *Execution and management of cryptographic algorithms.Asynchronous Data TransmissionAll communication to and from the Smart Card and the reader, is carried out over the C7 contact. Earlier, we defined the C7 contact as the Input / Output contact. Because data can only go over this one contact, communication is termed “half-duplex”. This simply means that only one party can communicate at a time, either the terminal (reader) or the Smart Card.Communication is always initiated by the terminal, the card only responds to the terminal’s instructions. The card never transmits data without a request from the terminal first. This simulates a client – server relationship. The Smart Card is the client, and the server is the terminal.Communication Flow of Card and TerminalStep 1 – Smart Card is inserted into the readerStep 2 – The Smart Card’s contacts are electrically activatedStep 3 – The Smart Card executes a power-on-reset and sends an answer-to-reset (ATR) to the terminalStep 4 – The terminal evaluates the ATR and pinpoints different card parameters. At this point, depending on the card, the terminal may send a PTS instruction to the card. PTS is protocol type selection. This instruction is used by the terminal to set various transmission parameters relating to the card’s protocol. We will go over protocols in the next section.Step 5 – If the PTS instruction was sent to the Smart Card, the Smart Card responds with an answer.Step 6 – Half duplex communication continues. The terminal sends an instruction, the Smart Card then sends an answer. This process continues until the card is deactivated (taken out of the reader).Communication between a Smart Card and the terminal is serial. This means that all the data processed is converted to a bit-serial data stream. (One byte is separated into eight individual bits. These bits are sent down the data stream one after another). In Smart Cards, data transmission is asynchronous. This means that each byte (8 bits) must be provided with additional bits. One of the additional bits is called a start bit. The start bit signals the beginning of a sending sequence (it tells the receiver that the byte is coming). After the byte, there is a parity bit for error detection and one or two stop bits. The stop bits give the receiver and the sender time to prepare for the next byte. An advantage of asynchronous transmission is that it doesn’t require a clock. The timing is generated by the timing between bits rather than a clock.
  2. Transmission ProtocolsA protocol is a set of rules and procedures governing the interchange of information between a Smart Card and the terminal. The protocol is the entire structure of communication.

 

Protocol Description
T = 0 Asynchronous, half-duplex, byte oriented
T = 1 Asynchronous, half-duplex, block oriented
T = 2 Asynchronous, full-duplex, block oriented
T = 3 Full duplex, currently not used
T = 4 Asynchronous, half-duplex, byte oriented (expansion of T=0)
T = 14 For national functions

Protocols T=0, and T=1 are the most commonly used protocols world wide. Protocols T=5 through T=13 and T=15 are reserved for future use and functions. T=14 is currently used in Germany in their card phones.

Transmission Protocol T=0

The smallest unit processed by the T=0 protocol is a single byte. This coins the term “byte-oriented”. Because of this protocol’s byte orientation, if a transmission error is detected, the byte must be requested again. Detection of these errors is possible because each byte has a parity bit attached. It is easier to understand how each byte is transmitted with the T=0 protocol with the following diagram:

Transmission-Protocol-Diagram

The guard time bit’s main function is to separate individual bytes during transmission. This gives the sender and the receiver more time to carry out the transmission protocol’s functions. If an error is detected during this byte transmission, the guard time bit turns into an error message that tells the card to resend the byte to the reader.

Transmission Protocol T=1

The T=1 protocol is a block protocol. The block is the smallest data unit that can be transmitted between the card and the terminal. Blocks are groups of bytes.

There are three types of blocks:
*Information Blocks (I-Blocks) – they are used for transparent exchange of application layer data.
*Reception Acknowledgment Block (R-Block) – never contains an information field, it serves for reception confirmation.
*System Blocks (S-Block) – used for control data which relate to the protocol itself.

T=1 transmission block structure

Transmission-Block-Structure

Blocks consist of a prologue field, information field, and epilogue field. The prologue and epilogue fields are mandatory.

Prologue field – transmitted at the beginning of a block; consists of the NAD, PCB, and LEN
*NAD – Node address – contains the blocks target and source addresses
*PCB – Protocol Control Byte – controls and supervises the transmission protocol
*LEN – Length – indicates the length of the information field in hexadecimal form

Information field – in an I-Block a container for the application layer’s data.
The contents of this field are transmitted transparently. This means simply that this information is forwarded by the transmission protocol without analysis or evaluation. Information field in an S-Block: a container for the transmission of data.
*APDU – Application Protocol Data Unit, command ADPU – represent instructions to the card, response ADPU – answers from the card

Epilogue field – transmitted at the end of a block; contains error detection code (EDC)

  1. Memory Cards
    A memory card contains a memory chip with read/write capability and in some cases, hardwired security functions. Memory cards are less expensive than microprocessor (Smart) cards, but they are also less functional. They contain limited address and security logic, EEPROM and ROM memory. The ROM is fixed, and the EEPROM is write/erase and read at will. In simple card designs, the logic exists to prevent writing and erasing of data. More complex card designs allow for restricted access of reading the memory. An example of a memory card application is a pre-paid telephone card.
  2. Synchronous Data Transmission
    Synchronous transmission is a serial transmission that requires a clock signal to provide timing and check the output of the data. It was designed with great simplicity. Synchronous transmission in memory cards allow the application in the terminal to access the chip’s memory addresses directly. Little logic is needed in the memory card (which makes them less expensive). The terminal completely takes over the physical addressing of memory. The card itself can only block certain areas against erasing.
    Transmission protocols used for memory cards are S=8, S=9, S=10
  3. Smart Card Readers
    A Smart Card reader is also referred to in the industry as an IFD (interface device), CAD (chip-accepting device), Smart Card adapter, or a CCR (chip-card reader). Smart Cards themselves are very similar in their technical construction unlike readers.Readers can be stationary, remote, work off-line, on-line, be battery powered or get its power supply from a connecting system. We are going to focus on stationary readers that receive their power from a system, mainly a pc. Throughout this section, we have referred to a terminal. To clarify, a Smart Card terminal consists of two components; a card reader and a computer system. The reader only takes care of a mechanical function. The computer system will control the reader electrically, establish a connection with other systems, and provide an interface for administration.

Mechanical Features of Smart Card Readers
In order for a Smart Card to interface with a terminal, you must make a type of contact that can transmit information electronically. When you insert a card into a reader, the card’s contacts connect to a conductor to the terminal’s computer. This contact to contact interface is necessary for communication.

Reader Contacts

There are two different types of contacting units in readers. Landing and sliding. Sliding contacts are comprised of a spring based unit that drags the contact elements across part of the Smart Card and it’s contact fields to make connection. While sliding contacts in readers make for a less expensive reader, it has a major draw back. Sliding can leave scratch marks on a Smart Card and slowly wears down the card’s gold plated surface. Mechanical landing contacts on the other hand use a lever type mechanism. Inserting the card causes the contact unit to press against the contact fields versus scraping across them. This greatly extends the life of the Smart Card and the reader.

CHERRY Specific Hardware Information

CHERRY currently uses three different chip sets or readers that are integrated into our keyboards. They include Gemcore, G&D, and CHERRY’s own chipset. All of our integrated readers feature mechanical landing contacts except for our G83-6700 keyboard which has sliding contacts as a standard option. (Landing contacts are available at an extra cost).

hardware-info

plugins

This article refers to:

All CHERRY Smart Card Readers

Answer:

All CHERRY Smart Card Readers will work with Military issued CAC cards.

The following models have been CAC Certified:

G83-6644        Smart Card Keyboard

G83-6744        Smart Card Keyboard

ST-1044          Stand Alone Smart Card Reader

SR-4044          PCMCIA Smart Card Reader

After installing smart card reader system hangs when shutting down

This article refers to:

CHERRY SmartBoard, G83-67xx
using HBCI Setup up to version 1.1 respectively
Smart Card Keyboard Driver up to version 1.6
under
Microsoft Windows 98
Microsoft Windows ME

Description:
After installing the chip card reader the system hangs while shutting down or the time until the PC switches off is longer than before.

Solution:
Uninstall the HBCI Setup up to version 1.1 respectively Smart Card Keyboard Driver up to version 1.6.
Reboot your system.
Use CHERRY Setup for SmartCard Keyboard, version 2.0 or higher!

Please note:
Under http://support.CHERRY.de -> “personal Login” -> Change Profile -> Next -> “Keyboards according to PC/SC specification” you can subscribe the appropriate newsletter. It will inform you about data and features/bug fixes of new Setup versions!

Connecting the keyboard to two computers using a KVM (change over) switch

Description:

CHERRY keyboards with PC/SC compatible smart card reader (e.g. G83-6744, G83-6644, etc.) are to be used simultaneously at two computers. For this a mechanical or electronic change-over switch is used, which switches the keyboard depending upon requirement to the first or the second PC.

Accessing the smart card reader is not possible over the change-over switch. But: The keyboard directly plugged to the PC works fine.

Using an electronic change-over switch ‘blocks’ the special commands for communication with the smart card reader.

Using a mechanical change-over switch the smart card reader will be deactivated.

Solution:

The CHERRY keyboard’s chip card reader is compatible with the ‘PC/SC’ standard initiated by Microsoft. A PC/SC reader is no longer addressable after the source voltage has been switched off or over.

The PC/SC Resource Manager saves the last ‘communication status’ of the chip card reader. The reader executes a reset after the operating voltage is applied. It is then addressable. It does not set itself to ‘active’ (‘claimed’), however, but has to be ‘restarted’ (‘reclaimed’) again by the driver.

This procedure is the conversion of the PC/SC specification. In a different procedure, the status of the reader would no longer be defined precisely to the Resource Manager.

This behavior could be solved only using a mechanical change-over switch and switch only data and clock control – but not the power supply.

LED flashed red – Protected PIN entry mode – PIN does not leave the keyboard

This article refers to following CHERRY keyboards with CHERRY PC/SC smart card readers (and the feature ‘Protected PIN Entry Mode’):

Description:

In Protected PIN Entry Mode the verification of the correct PIN takes place within the keyboard, i.e. the PIN will not be transmitted to the PC, but transmitted within the keyboard directly to the smart card.

Thus it is not possible to spy the PIN from the data line of the keyboard wire or with a ‘Trojan’ program on the PC.

As a visible display for the activation of the “Protected PIN entry mode” the PIN-LED (Scroll LOCK) flashes red.

The Protected PIN entry mode can be activated by standard CT-API commands ‘Perform verification’ or ‘Modify verification DATA’.

The specification is called MKT version 1.0 and can be downloaded under http://www.teletrust.de –> publications –> MKT. The security of this solution was evaluated for some versions of the keyboards by TUEV IT with the approval IT SEC E2-high (due to German signature law).

Deactivation of subsequently installed MS Smart Card Base Components

This article refers to:
a) CHERRY keyboards ‘SmartBoard G83-67xx’ and
b) subsequently installed ‘MS Smart Card Base Components’
under
MS Windows 2000
MS windows XP

Description:
The MS Smart Card Base Components (necessary for the operation of PC/SC based smart card readers) are already part of the Win2000 and WinXP operating system.

These components are only available for Win9x, WinME, and WinNT.
Installing them under Win2000 or WinXP destroys already available functions and thus the system can not access the PC/SC smart card reader any more.

Uninstallation of the ‘Microsoft Smart Card Base Components’ will not fix the system!

To deactivate the components and reestablish the origin functions of the operating system refer to following solution:

Solution for Win2000:
1) Login as an Administrator

2) Under START – Execute successively type in following commands:
Regsvr32 %windir%\system32\scardssp.dll
[confirm with OK]

Scardsvr reinstall
[confirm with OK]

3) Have a look in Start – Settings – Control Panel – Administrative Tools – Services and locate the entry ‘Smart Card’. Check the current status. If it should not be started, try to start it (right mouse button – ‘start’)

4) Independent whether the service can be started or not set the type of start from ‘manual’ to ‘automatic’.

5) Restart your computer.

Solution for WinXP:
1) Login as an Administrator

2) Under START – Execute successively type in following commands:
Regsvr32 %windir%\system32\scardssp.dll
[confirm with OK]

Scardsvr reinstall
[confirm with OK]

3) Create a reg file (name does not matter, e.g. ‘active.reg’) with the following content (please absolutely pay attention for the correct spelling!):

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\SCardSvr]
“ObjectName”=”NT AUTHORITY\\LocalService”
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\SCardDrv]
“ObjectName”=”NT AUTHORITY\\LocalService”

4) Save this file to disk and then double click on it. Thus the registry will be updated.

5) Have a look in Start – Settings – Control Panel – Administrative Tools – Services and locate the entry ‘Smart Card’. Check the current status. If it should not be started, try to start it (right mouse button – ‘start’)

6) Independent whether the service can be started or not set the type of start from ‘manual’ to ‘automatic’.

7) Restart your computer

Warranty/Repairs

This article refers to:

All CHERRY Keyboards

Answer:

We are sorry but CHERRY does not sell repair parts for our keyboards. The keyboard must be sent to our authorized repair facility to be repaired.

CHERRY does not sell repair parts in order to maintain the integrity of the repairs and the CHERRY quality standards. If repairs have been completed by an entity other than our authorized service provider, CHERRY cannot guarantee the quality and workmanship that is synonymous with the CHERRY name.

For information on our authorized service provider please contact Keyboard Technical Support at:

1 (800) 510 1689 or keyboardsupport@zf.com

Answer:

Please contact Keyboard Technical Support first to see if the keyboard is actually in need of repair or if it is a simple fix.

Keyboard Technical Support:

1-800-510-1689 or keyboardsupport@zf.com

CHERRY’s authorized service provider for Canada is Grand Tech Services.

Grand Tech Services
1 (800) 567 0586
70 East Beaver Creek Rd.
#21-23
Richmond Hill, Ontario
L4B 3B2

Answer:

Please contact Keyboard Technical Support first to see if the keyboard is actually in need of repair or if it is a simple fix.

Keyboard Technical Support:

1 (800) 510 1689 or keyboardsupport@zf.com

CHERRY’s authorized service provider for the US is Gremark Technologies.

Gremark Technologies
(630) 705 0900
1400 Brook Drive
Downer’s Grove Ill 60515
www.gtiservice.com

CHERRY WARRANTY INFORMATION FOR POS SERIES KEYBOARDS

CHERRY keyboard / input device warranty time frame:

  • The warranty on CHERRY SPOS, LPOS, and MPOS series Keyboards is 3 years from date of manufacture for ALL part numbers. 

CHERRY SPOS series keyboards are covered by warranty provided: 

  • The date code falls into the correct time frame designated by CHERRY. The last five digits of the serial number are the date code. This can be found on the bottom of the keyboard. They will consist of four numbers and a letter. The first three numbers correspond to the day of the year the keyboard was manufactured. The fourth numbers corresponds to the year in which it was manufactured. Current sequence is as follows: 5 = 2005, 6 = 2006, 7 = 2007 etc.The letter that follows the numbers indicates which shift manufactured the keyboard; A = 1st , B = 2nd, and C= 3rd. (see example label below)

datecode1 

The date code 2565A means the keyboard was manufactured on the 256th day of 2005 by 1st shift. 

OR 

  • the customer provides a proof of purchase (invoice) showing the keyboard was bought within the last 3 years. 

CHERRY warranty is void and the customer is responsible for replacement if: 

  • The customer cannot provide proof of purchase, or if the keyboard states an out of warranty date code.
  • A modification/repair is made by any unauthorized facility.
  • Reason for failure is recognized as spillage.
  • Product has been abused, i.e. cable damage, bent pins, missing keycaps, cracked housing due to being dropped.
  • no trouble found *
  • programming *

* A diagnostic fee will be assessed for all keyboards that are deemed no trouble found or programmed incorrectly. These charges differ depending upon the keyboard that is being tested. Standard turn around for repairs is 5-7 business days from date received; based upon parts availability.

Please contact CHERRY Technical Support to help diagnose the problem you may be experiencing or for information on where to send the keyboard for repair. 

 CHERRY Technical Support:
Toll free: 1 (800) 510 1689
Email: keyboardsupport@zf.com

CHERRY WARRANTY INFORMATION FOR RC SERIES KEYBOARDS 

CHERRY keyboard / input device warranty time frame:

  • The warranty on CHERRY RC series Keyboards is 3 years from date of manufacture for ALL part numbers. 

CHERRY RC series keyboards are covered by warranty provided: 

  • The date code falls into the correct time frame designated by CHERRY. The last five digits of the serial number are the date code. This can be found on the bottom of the keyboard. They will consist of four numbers and a letter. The first three numbers correspond to the day of the year the keyboard was manufactured. The fourth numbers corresponds to the year in which it was manufactured. Current sequence is as follows: 5 = 2005, 6 = 2006, 7 = 2007 etc.The letter that follows the numbers indicates which shift manufactured the keyboard; A = 1st , B = 2nd, and C= 3rd. (see example label below)

datecode2

OR The date code 3006A means the keyboard was manufactured on the 300th day of 2006 by 1st shift. 

  • the customer provides a proof of purchase (invoice) showing the keyboard was bought within the last 3 years. 

CHERRY warranty is void and the customer is responsible for replacement if: 

  • The customer cannot provide proof of purchase, or if the keyboard states an out of warranty date code.
  • A modification/repair is made by any unauthorized facility.
  • Reason for failure is recognized as spillage.
  • Product has been abused, i.e. cable damage, bent pins, missing keycaps, cracked housing due to being dropped.
  • no trouble found *
  • programming *

* A diagnostic fee will be assessed for all keyboards that are deemed no trouble found or programmed incorrectly. These charges differ depending upon the keyboard that is being tested. Standard turn around for repairs is 5-7 business days from date received; based upon parts availability.

Please contact CHERRY Technical Support to help diagnose the problem you may be experiencing or for information on where to send the keyboard for repair.

 CHERRY Technical Support:
Toll free: 1 (800) 510 1689
Email: keyboardsupport@zf.com

CHERRY WARRANTY INFORMATION 

CHERRY keyboard / input device warranty time frame:

  • The warranty on CHERRY Keyboards and Mice is 2 years from date of manufacture for ALL part numbers except the SPOS, RC, and G81-7000/8000 series. 

CHERRY keyboards are covered by warranty provided: 

  • The date code falls into the correct time frame designated by CHERRY. The last three digits of the serial number are the date code. This can be found on the bottom of the keyboard. They will consist of a letter and two numbers. The letter corresponds to the year the keyboard was manufactured. Current sequence is as follows: Q = 2004, R = 2005, S = 2006 etc.The two digits that follow the letter correspond to the week number the keyboard was manufactured. (see example label below)

datecode3

OR The date code R46 means the keyboard was manufactured in the 46th week of 2005. 

  • the customer provides a proof of purchase (invoice) showing the keyboard was bought within the last 2 years.

CHERRY warranty is void and the customer is responsible for the repair if: 

  • The customer cannot provide proof of purchase, or if the keyboard states an out of warranty date code.
  • A modification/repair is made by any unauthorized facility. CHERRY authorized facilities are listed in this document on page 2.
  • Reason for failure is recognized as spillage.
  • Product has been abused, i.e. cable damage, bent pins, missing keycaps, cracked housing due to being dropped.
  • no trouble found *
  • programming *

* A diagnostic fee will be assessed for all keyboards that are deemed no trouble found or programmed incorrectly. These charges differ depending upon the keyboard that is being tested. Standard turn around for repairs is 5-7 business days from date received; based upon parts availability.

Please contact CHERRY Technical Support to help diagnose the problem you may be experiencing or for information on where to send the keyboard for repair.

CHERRY Technical Support:
Toll free: 1 (800) 510 1689
Email: keyboardsupport@zf.com

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